Memories of Lueders, Texas
Note:. . . . . . . .
This is a continuation page starting on August 17, 2004 from the Alumni Memories starting on August 12, 2005

The messages are displayed in sequences as received and without editing. However, when not provided, the author's name and class year were added.


The following Chatter occurred on August 17, 2004

My life long friend, Albert is a fireman in Abilene. He commutes back and forth from Abilene to Lueders to help care for Ruthie Lee. Albert has done wonders in helping Ruthie Lee to remain at home. He rearranged her living space so she didn't have to negotiate distances to take care of her needs. He supplied her with a hospital bed and other geriatric equipment. He makes sure she takes her medication and keeps the numerous pills etc. organized as well as picking up the prescriptions etc. etc. I can't say enough kind words about Albert. He has such a caring nature. And indeed, if it weren't for Ruthie's neighbors, Thurman "Buddie" Thomas and others, Ruthie would not be able to stay in Lueders as she has.

Albert's grandmother, Lucien Wilhite's wife, was a sister to Ruthie Lee's mother.

Stephen Vinson  -  Class of 67


George Newell was the first night watchman. I asked Robert Sanders about that one time. By the way Robert lived to be in his early 90's. He was instrumental in helping to clean up the Lueders dump ground...more plolitely known as our Community Refuse Center. At 89, Robert operated the backhoe and helped load numerous loads of trash and other debris into roll offs. I can still see him on the back hoe. hauling away an old gasoline tank that had been used for storing used oil.. I helped Robert tie the tank onto the backhoe with chain, following his instructions. And low and behold..when he lifted that tank off the ground with the hoe part of the back hoe, it balanced perfectly and he was able to remove it from the refuse center to another location for storage. All of this at 89 years of age!!!

By the way, the refuse center is located at the very location where the refinery used to be.

Stephen Vinson  -  Class of 67


Another Robert Sander's story.

Robert Sanders was one of the first city councilmen. He told me he got on the council to help rid the town of the numerous "hog pens" scattered over the town.

Stephen Vinson  -  Class of 67


I just got on here after being off line for 2 days due to the hurricane Charley which passed through Florida and I am sorry but, I don't know who Lewissvtx5@aol.com is and I would like to know that and which year they graduated so my memory can be refreshed and I can grasp the continuity of what is going on and perhaps enjoy what is being said. THANKS, -- E. Ray Smyth  -  Class of 53
Lewissvtx5 is my AOL Address..Stephen Vinson, Son of Maurese and Stanley Vinson, and I always spoke my mind about most things..so forgive me if I seem too "know it allish." My mom always told me: "Stephen, don't tell all you know." She never gave any specifics.

I will say that what I have gotten from many of our "memories" is that #1. We each have a different "era" of Lueders in our memory banks. My memory of Lueders stretches from say around 1953/54 when I first could make heads or tails of the world...to 1965 when we moved to Abilene and then on to Austin. So, my concept of Lueders differs greatly from those of you whose "eras" reach before that OR way ahead of it. Also, as Edith Ham said Sunday, "We all have different eyes and have seen things differently." For instance, I have never planted cotton in my life and when I look at a cotton field I see something completely different in many ways to what Edith, who planted it most of her life, sees. There are those differences that make our memories interesting and rich. I have filled in the blanks about cotton by asking questions. We seem to be doing that in our chat here ...asking questions and having them answered by others who might know.... and in the process having a good time remembering.

Stephen Vinson  -  Class of 67


Stephen it is a lot of fun having someone like your self tell me stories about the decade after I left my wonderful little community and moved to the big city of Abilene.

Mr. Frank Burkman - Class of 39, can tell me of the times before my decade. So, with all of us chattering about each of our decades we all learn more about Lueders and the place most of us grew up in.

AND what is so great about it all is, having the Pirate mailing list to communicate these memories with. I wouldn't worry about saying too much. I happen to be the guy, if asked the time I will tell you how to build a watch.

What we have been having is lots of trouble figuring out who is saying WHAT to WHOM and maintaining a continuity between feed backs on the messages.

That is why the heading was changed today to ask folks to not erase the previous message when replying and to add your name and Class year because today alone 3 people sent me e-mails saying they could not follow the stories because they were having trouble knowing WHO was talking to WHOM about WHAT. Most of the feed back is coming from folks who never reply on the Pirate due to there own shyness or other personal reason but, they do subscribe and enjoy all the writings except they are bothered that they don't know who is telling the story and that makes it hard for them to follow the story line..

I have personally been thrilled with all the chatter that has been passing back and forth and told Don Latimer he sure started something. But, frankly Stephen that was exactly what I wanted to see happen. So, I encourage and ask that you keep it up and allow the folks to enjoy your remembrances of Lueders and it's people.

You are the kind of person that makes something like the Pirate mailing list so wonderful for your fellow Pirates and makes it worth while to Carlene and myself for the efforts we put into the Web Site because we enjoy seeing so many taking part in the Web Site.

However, it has been asked by Carlene and myself because we have been asked by others to see if we can get folks to identify them selves and leave the previous message intact so a new person who has been off line for a few days can pickup and understand what the story is about and who is doing the writing and what class year, so we can all better grasp the story line.

So, please never worry about writing too much, just please identify yourself in every message so folks will know who the story is coming from and their class year to help jog folks memory or in some case like yourself we may say well ok Stephen is from a later era and that is why I am not remembering it, I wasn't even there. Otherwise some of us will be wondering if we are getting Alzheimers.

The private feed back I have been receiving from other Pirates is how wonderful it is to read about Lueders and how enjoyable it is to learn of the unknown things and be reminded of other things long forgotten..

I just posted to the Web Site a new update Don Latimer sent me and things said in these messages are starting to show up in Don's writings.

So Stephen Vinson, just keep telling us stories because we are enjoying them AND THANKS for doing so.

I think your father use to sell me my clothes and we even ordered some special

E. Ray Smyth  -  Class of 53


Just another little bit of a tidbit for all you young'uns out there. I recall that in the late 1920's or early 1930's there was a sign on the highway on both sides of Lueders that this day and time would not be permitted. It stated "NIGGER DON'T LET THE SUN GO DOWN ON YOU HERE". However they both disappeared in about the mid 30's. As best as I recall the reason for it was supposed to have been because of the rape of a white girl by a negro transit cotton puller. When all of this occurred I have no idea. I can just barely remember some where in the middle 20's seeing transit nego cotton pullers come through there in the fall of the year. There were white and spanish cotton pullers come through from south Texas also. Just about each farm had a 2 room building that they stayed in. At that time we lived on a farm about 5 miles north of Lueders, that was known as "The Monty Johnson Place" He was the father of Clara Ann and Virginia Johnson. Virginia and I were in the same class and we graduated in 1939. I was born 27 July 1920. Well I have diversed allot from my original story and apologize, but sometimes I get carried away and start rambling.

F. W. BURKMAN  -  Class of 39


My aunt, Maxine Vaughn Payne, has been sending me loads of email about her life growing up in Lueders and seeing what F. Burkman wrote, I went back and found this paragraph she had written to me. This was in the mid 40's she's talking about.

A Mr. Stamford wanted to lay out the town and a Mr. Lueders wanted to lay out the town. Mr. Lueders was chosen so Mr. Stamford went on up to what is now Stamford and laid out that town.

The black people were not allowed to live in Lueders, they would get shot, so they moved on to Stamford. In the movie theaters at Stamford, the blacks had to sit in the balcony. This was even at the time I was dating.

Terry Johnson Blackburn  -  Class of 66 in Abilene
Granddaughter of Mamie Vaughn


I stand corrected on date....it was late 30's to early 40's.
Terry Johnson Blackburn  -  Class of 66 in Abilene
Granddaughter of Mamie Vaughn
Daughter of Odessa Vaughn Johnson

Hey Terry, I am enjoying your stories. It sounds plausable that a Mr. Lueders would have laid out the town here because many a time that would have been true in small Texas towns. Often times the towns were named and formed by the rail roads that came thru, the name would be that of a depot agent or a combination of names OR the name of the first post master. Up the road toward Albany you have a restored "dot in the road" called Bud Matthew's Switch. It was named for a rancher who brought his cattle to that destination to be shipped on the rail road.

As far as Lueders goes, I know it was named for Frederick Lueders, who was German, and who had been given an amount of land for his service in war for the U. S. Frederick Lueders never came to this West Texas country, instead, in a round about way, his relatives and/or friends did receive the land and so on and so forth..Lueders, the town proper, came to be a town around the turn of the century. A large stone school building was built in around 1899 or 1900. Prior to that they had a weather beaten, wooden one.

A family by the name of (German spelling) Fuchs..later changed to Fox were connected with Lueders and they were some of the first settlers as far as I know. They were instrumental in the limestone quarrying we still have today. Before coming to West Texas..they lived in the Central Texas town of Marble Falls, also limestone country.

Some of our town was part of the Ericksdahl land owned orignially by the Swenson family and later sold to folks from Scandinavia who wished to settle here: the "Damned Swedes" as Ernestine Heller referred to, and the "Danged Danes." All part of the early settling of this place.

A rather remarkable event occurred several years ago. A man and his wife were visiting Lueders and approached my family about the possibility of purchasing the house I now live in. Come to find out, the man was the great great great grandson of Frederick Lueders, himself, the town's namesake!!!!!

Lueders does have a sordid history of persecuting blacks who came thru here or wanted to settle here. It seems probable, that as conservative as man as my dad, Stanely, was, that he would be prejudiced, yet he was certainly not.

Stephen Vinson  -  Class of 67


Re: the balcony at the Grand Theater in Stamford. Yep, I do remember it being for "Coloreds" there was a small, lighted sign saying Colored that indicated the distinction, as well as segregated bathrooms as well.
Stephen Vinson  -  Class of 67
Hello Terry, Stephen and Mr. Burkman,

You might want to read the latest version of "A Little History of Lueders, Texas" posted at:

http://www.raysmyth.net/holt/index.html

There was a short period of time in the early 50s that we had blacks attend Lueders schools. Thery was a black family living on the Steele place close to where I lived southwest of Lueders. They had some young children and as Lueders didn't have a seperate school for Blacks, they attended Lueders Elementary School. I don't remember if they rode our bus but I kinda think they did. They didn't live there too long before they moved.

Also in the early 50s, (I know they did in 1953) the Stamford Black youths had a softball team and would come over to Lueders and play the Lueders youth team under the lights at the softball field just west of the football field.

Don Latimer, Class of 56


Speaking of the Monty Johnson family. Mrs. Johnson, Linea I believe was her name, (forgive my misspelling) Linea Johnson was a unique and brilliant woman. My grandmother, Eunice Putnam, spoke about Linea knowing 7 or 8 languages and how she was such a good business person. Unfortunately, Linea was ill most of her life. Linea was one of the early settlers in the Ericksdahl Community.
Stephen Vinson  -  Class of 67
More interesting things from my Aunt Maxine Vaughn Payne:

I was baptized in the Clear Fork Of Brazos river Mother (Mamie Vaughn) had pictures of people holding hands being led out in the river. People sang "Shall We Gather at the River" and "On Jordan's Stormy Banks I Stand". We had to go through a barbed wire fence while someone held the wires apart, then we were at Leibs crossing where the water was shallow before it got deep enough to be baptized.

The Arrington kids, Wene (Corienne Vaughn Cox, Maxine's twin and now deceased) and I, used to walk to the river at Leibs crossing and pick up mussle shells, open them up and find little pearls. The Leibs crossed real shallow water in their car, hence Leibs crossing. (Their land).

Terry Johnson Blackburn  -  Class of 66 in Abilene
Niece of Maxine Vaughn Payne


Stephen--That spelling is Monnie Johnson and Linnea.
Greta "Olson" Corbitt  -  Class of 52
Hi Don, That is an excellent write up. 'A Little History of Lueders, Texas'. How did you do in History in school? Great job. Pat "Culpepper" Roberts  -  Class of 61
More interesting things from my Aunt Maxine Vaughn Payne:.....
I was baptized in the Clear Fork Of Brazos river Mother (Mamie Vaughn) had pictures of people holding hands being led out in the river. People sang "Shall We Gather at the River" and "On Jordan's Stormy Banks I Stand". We had to go through a barbed wire fence while someone held the wires apart, then we were at Leibs crossing where the water was shallow before it got deep enough to be baptized.

The Arrington kids, Wene (Corienne Vaughn Cox, Maxine's twin and now deceased) and I, used to walk to the river at Leibs crossing and pick up mussle shells, open them up and find little pearls. The Leibs crossed real shallow water in their car, hence Leibs crossing. (Their land).

Terry Johnson Blackburn  -  Class of 66 in Abilene
Niece of Maxine Vaughn Payne


I was baptised in the clear fork of the brazos also. It was not the Lied crossing in the late 40's or early 50's. We went to the Baptist Encampent grounds. I cannot remember a particular date. Liebs crossing is a little North of the Encampent. Either way is fine, either place is fine. Thank you.
Glenn Commons  -  Class of 54
Thanks Pat,

Glad you liked it. I've enjoyed putting it together. History wasn't my best subject.

I'd like to add a few things to it. I haven't said too much about the rairoad. I'm trying to get a little more info on the Texas Central & the MK&T

Don Latimer  -  Class of 56


Hi Reba,

So sorry I didn't respond sooner. Was caught up in everything else I guess. Didn't we meet last year? I was sitting next to my aunt (Dackie) Maxine Vaughn Payne and I think you and your husband were visiting with my uncle Bo (Orlan). My aunt has been emailing me so many stories of her youthful days in Lueders and now I'm just fascinated with all the things I've been reading from other readers. I will past this message from you to Uncle Bo and Aunt Dackie. I'm sure they will enjoy reading about the "smells from their Dad's shoe shop". LOL As soon as I get all of Aunt Dackie's letters in order about the shoe shop, location, etc. I'll write and get the story straight for all of you readers out there.

For those of you reading this and wondering how Maxine came to be Aunt Dackie.......my cousin Charlotte (Corienne's daughter) was the 1st born niece and couldn't say Mackie, thus Dackie was born. :-)

BTW....thank you Carlene for re-sending this to me.

Terry Johnson Blackburn  -  Class of 66 in Abilene
Daughter of Odessa Vaughn Johnson
Granddaughter of Mamie Vaughn


Rena, My aunt Dackie said that she thinks my uncle Bo has all of their Mom's pictures and I have written him asking him if he might possibly have it. And, if he does I am sure he will see that I get it. Let's hope and pray he has it and that it's the picture you are looking for. And NO MONEY! What are friends for, if we can't help each other out now and then, huh?

Terry Johnson Blackburn '66  -  Class of 66 in Abilene
Daughter of Odessa Vaughn Johnson


The following Chatter occurred on August 18, 2004

Indeed, I have read Don's nicely done "history" of Lueders. It capsulizes many of the events I knew of and heard about from my Aunt, Mary Vandeventer, and also my mom and grandmother, over time. Of course there were personal anecdotes my grandmother knew that were priceless regarding her life in Lueders. That era spanned from 1905 or so thru 1968. I daresay, that many of you have these treasures passed down to you from your relatives, memories and personal experiences.
Stephen Vinson  -  Class of 67
A family of blacks was transfered to Lueders with the Railroad. His wife helped Mother with spring cleaning and their dtr played with us 4 kids. The little girl was to start schood that fall. This was in 1953 or 1954.

Daddy was President of the School Board at that time. I remember he was a board meetings every night just before school started. After several nights, he came home and told Mother that it was voted on to not let the little girl start school, because there was no way to fix the water fountains and bathrooms for one black. He had tears in his eyes and said he was appointed to tell them of the decision. That was very hard on him as they had become good friends with our family.

Mother would go to Stamford and pick up black cleaning women and their children to help with the Spring cleaning and for us kids to get to know and be around them.

Cheryl McCown Gilmore  -  Class of 65 in Wichita Falls


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Does any one remember the tent skating rink set up on the north side of the street about a block east of the refinery? Or the first picture show which was in a tent next to Fred Sides garage on the north of the street.
Wayne Verble  -  Class of 53
Wayne,
Check out the Lueders History on the Lueders/Avoca Web site. It has a paragraph on the picture shows.
Don Latimer  -  Class of 56
Wayne, of course I remember it. That is where I first learned to skate. I recall the first night or 2 making all those circles hanging onto the hand rail and them dang skates not staying under me. I had never had anything on my feet so stupid as those wheels.

The skates were the kind that fastened on to your own shoes. I think they had some shoe skates but, most of us kids used the buckle on type.

As I recall you sometimes worked there buckling on the skates for the skaters and acted as floor bouncer...

I don't think I was ever involved but, they would shut the rink down at certain times and play hockey on roller skates. For hockey sticks they used brooms with the handles shortened and the bristles cut off back nearly to the first tie string.

They also had periods for couples only skating. Seems like we had other specials events also, girls only and then boys only or something like that..

I think most all Lueders kids of our generations must have first learned to skate at that traveling rink.

They oiled the wooden floor with a big old oil mop and this mop was usually left in one of the far corners down opposite from the entrance and were you put your skates on.

One night and I want to say it was G. H. Cobb who was smoking a cigarette and he went to flip it out through one of the raised up sides and missed. The cigarette fell back in on the mop and it went up in flames.

G. H. garbed the mop and was trying to throw it out through the raised side when someone went running by and he had to pull the mop back inside and by that time the owner had run the length of the rink and was there but, if my memory servers me right G. H. got it threw out and everything was Ok. but, it had come darn near burning the place down because the flames were really hugh and near the top which was the tent.

I am not absolutely sure it was G. H. Cobb but, I sure believe it was. -- After that the new oil mop was kept in a tree outside.

Wayne I also recall how well you could skate and I remember how loose you kept the wheel wobble or whatever that adjustment was called that allowed you to skate real fancy.

AND, I recall us later skating at the Schoolars and then L. E. Wilhites. By the time L. E. put their rink in I was in high school and L. E. was going to Fort Worth to buy shoe skates and he took orders from several of us and brought our shoe skates back from Fort Worth. I used those skates for years and up to at least the late 60's early 70's because I used to skate at a rink here in Titusville, Florida with the kids when they were little. Have not had the skates on in years but, still have them. Those shoe skates are now over 50 years old and still in decent shape. They also now have a prominent place in the Smythsonian. Ha! :-)

It is awful hard for me to remember the date period the tent skating rink was in Lueders. But, I think it had to be just prior to 1947 because I recall being down to the rink in our 1941 Ford and the jeep we had was a 1947 so I can sort of date the period like that. In August of 1946 I would have turned 12 years old so that kind of fits too.

AND Yep, I still recall things about the old tent picture show. Do you remember the Names Brothers letting us watch the show free if we took our finger and kept the film wound because they had a projector that was broke and wouldn't rewind the film so they did it by poking your finger in a reel spoke and going round and round. AND Wayne I even remember the two of us taking turns winding the film. They got us to do it so they could stay outside and flirt with the girls.

Tailspin Tommy was shown regularly and was one of our favorite picture show characters. I forget the actors name except for the Tailspin Tommy part. Of course it always had to do with airplanes so I expect it was not a favorite of the girls.

Don Latimer's "A Little History of Lueders, Texas" has a nice paragraph on the tent picture show and you can find Don's history on the Lueders Avoca Web site under Lueders History. It is also on my personal web site. I know Don has already told you that but, for others reading this I will say it again because some folks are not yet aware.

E. Ray Smyth  -  Class of 53


I remember both. When you went to the picture show in the winter you would freeze your tail off. Those were the good old days HA.

Later they had a shateing rink on the highway going toward Albany. Across from where the American Legion Hall is now.

Glenn Commons  -  Class of 54


Wayne,
Thanks for the info about the skating rink there on the north side of main street. I remember the later one (about 50 or 51) across from the American Legion, operated by the Schoolers, as being a tent also. Is that correct?
Don Latimer  -  Class of 56
I've have a query from a daughter of Bonnie Albert Miller, Jr. looking for information about the Miller family. Bonnie Albert Miller, Jr. was born in Lueders in 1927 and the daughter thinks he attended Lueders Schools, at least for awhile. He died 2001.

The father of Bonnie, Bonnie Albert Miller, Sr. disappeared before Bonnie Junior was born and thus the family didn't have any more links with the Miller family.

Bonnie, Sr. was married to Jettie Covery. Jettie Covey's father, Arthur J. Covey (1877-1948) is buried in the Clear Fork Cemetery. Arthur Covey's father-in-law, Edward McNeil Todd (1850-1940) is also buried in the Clearfork Cemetery.

Bonnie Junior had a sister, Rosalee Miller and a brother, Arthur Miller.

The daughter would be interested in talking with anyone who remembers these Miller children.

There's no connection to the Bonnie Miller, born about 1934, that lives in Albany, TX.

Don Latimer  -  Class of 56


All this chit chat is really great. I've been making tracks every evening to get to my computer and read the email. At school today, Winnie (Stapp) Barton gave me a copy of the history you had compiled, Don. I enjoyed it very much but haven't had time to read all of it yet. I had a very interesting happening that shows what a small world this is. I was teaching school in Victoria, Texas in the early '60s. It was just before the Christmas holidays and I was all excited about going home for the holidays. The music teacher at the school asked me where home was. I told her it was just a little bump in the road north of Abilene. I never expected anyone from down there to know where Lueders was, especially her because she was part of the 'country club set'. Well........her grandfather was Mr. Fox. Small world isn't it.
Ernestine Segerstrom Heller  -  Class of 53
Wayne, this is reba davis and yes l remember them both very well. The Names family ran the tent picture show and the first tent skating rink was run by some people from Merkel. l was in high school and l think it was the summers of 47 and 48. For the life of me l can not remember the families names, but they had a daughter my age and we became pretty good friends. Joyce Sides went to Merkel one Sunday after to visit her and l still have pictures that we took that day.
Reba "Meil" Davis  -  Class of 49
Don,

This is Reba Gayle, Butch Lewis' aunt, and l too want to thank you for your history of Lueders. l printed them out til l ran out of paper for folks that do not 'compute' (ha). So now l have more paper and will continue to do so. l mailed my 79 year old sister one this morn and l know she will really enjoy it.

There was one more doctor that was in Lueders and his name was Dr. Dunlap--he delivered Harold Petty and myself about an hour apart---HE'S THE OLDEST!!! Also the house that Jake and Ollie Register lived in that burned was known as the Dunlap house. l do not remember him but remember he had a daughter named Ada Lou.

Memories are strange they come to piece meal, don't they.So see how many folks you've made happy with a stroll down memory lane.

Thanks again, Reba "Meil" Davis  -  Class of 49


l'm replying to myself l suppose, but the people from Merkle' names were Conley. And after re-reading my message--l need to proof read BEFORE l press send, what do 'ya think, ha?

Reba "Meil" Davis  -  Class of 49


There was a tent movie theater first and then someone built a regular building for a movie theater. The Names ran the tent theater, but I don't believe they ran the other one, did they? Didn't they run the skating rink, too?
Greta "Olson" Corbitt  -  Class of 52
Reba Gayle,

Thanks. I've added Dr. Robert Dunlap (1880-1932) to my list of Drs. He's buried in Spring Creek Cem.

It may be a little while before we update the history again.

Don Latimer  -  Class of 56


There was also a Dr. Bailey who lived across the street from us and across from the Thorntons. There was a Dr. McDonald also who had two Sons that I remember. One was DN & the other was NF. they moved to Stamford where Dr. McDonald had a Drug Store and DN worked in the store in the summer with air conditioning and went out for football in the fall and died from a heat stroke. I don't remember the year he died
Ken Webb  -  Class of 46
The following Chatter occurred on August 19, 2004

Ken,

Thanks for the lead on Dr. McDonald. I have a Bailey & McDonald listed but didn't know their first names.

Dr. Newton Ferdinand McDonald (1875-1944) is buried in the Highland Cemetery.

The one son may be Newton, Jr. There is a Newton F. McDonald living in Leander, Texas that was born about 1921.

The other son was Daniel Neivell McDonald, born Sep 4, 1925 and died Sep 1, 1941. He's also buried in the Highland Cemetery.

Thanks again, Don Latimer  -  Class of 56


Don, AS I recall the story of how Lueders got its name from my mother Cora Mae Tonroy Hines.There was some sort of disagreement as to what it would be named and I don't remember the other name in question but a man named Lueders got on the train and went to Washington DC and had the town named before anyone knew what was happening. Seems to me the disagreement was between Lueders and some of the Swensons. Craig Tonroy may remember more about this from hearing it from his Dad and my Uncle Les Tonroy.

Lueders did indeed have a baaaaaaaaaad reputation as for as black people were concerned. My Grandparents lived southeast of town ( the Tonroy's) and I remember many many times a load of black people would stop and ask my grand paw or Uncle Carl to escort them through Lueders by riding on the running board of their car. Especially if it was getting close to dark.

Thanks again, Sharon Rose "Hines" Hudson  -  Class of 57 in Wichita Falls


Sharon,

There may have been some controversy about naming the town, but the only Lueders involved was the Frederick Lueders, killed on the battlefield of San Jacinto in the battle for independence.

Let me know if you discover any more details from Craig.

Don Latimer  -  Class of 56


The following Chatter occurred on August 20, 2004

In Don Latimer's " A Little History of Lueders, Texas", he talks about the theatres in Lueders and after The Texas Theater burned down in 1950 at Lueders, the closest movie theatres were in Stamford.

I was looking at some of the photos that were my parents photos, which I now have and I came across a photo of a Theatre. There's not any writing on the back except there is a stamped developed date, May 1948.

Reading " A Little History of Lueders, Texas", I have figured out that the theatre photo must be the Stamford Theatre named State Theatre. From the photo I can even see what's showing on the date the photo was taken. The show playing, May 1958 at the State Theatre, was, " Ghost Town Renegades."

I thought this photo would bring back memories for some of you and you might like to have a copy of this photo. I added two views of the same photo. One is the full photo as it is and the next photo is a cropped version so you can see a closer view of the theatre and not so much sky and street.

You can view the 1st photo by clicking this link:...     Click Here:

You can view the 2nd photo by clicking this link:...     Click Here:

If you can't click to go there then copy the web link above and paste it in your web browser address bar.

If you have any problems viewing or going to view the photo in your web browser and you would like to have the photo, you can personally e-mail me at laocb@luedersavoca.org and I'll email you the photo. Please do not reply to this message if you are having problems with viewing the photo or you would like the photos emailed to you, send a new message to, laocb@luedersavoca.org.

Enjoy the photos.

Regards, Carlene "Burkman" Black  -  Class of 72


Back in the 1930,s there was movie showing in the top floor of the Hocus-Pocus building. I know two girls that attended all the time. They didn't have to pay. The manager was quite handsome. I don't think it lasted very long, a couple of months. There is so much you guys need to know about the olden days.

Winnie Stapp Barton  -  Class of 40


In Don Latimer's " A Little History of Lueders, Texas", he talks about the theatres in Lueders and after The Texas Theater burned down in 1950 at Lueders, the closest movie theatres were in Stamford.

I was looking at some of the photos that were my parents photos, which I now have and I came across a photo of a Theatre. There's not any writing on the back except there is a stamped developed date, May 1948.

Reading " A Little History of Lueders, Texas", I have figured out that the theatre photo must be the Stamford Theatre named State Theatre. From the photo I can even see what's showing on the date the photo was taken. The show playing, May 1958 at the State Theatre, was, " Ghost Town Renegades."

One memory that I have of the "Texas Theater" in Lueders involves my misbehaving. My mother took Stacey and me to a movie at the theather. I don't remember the movie, but I do remember that I managed to get myself into a kid ball and ROLL down the aisle that slanted steeply down to the screen. Poor mom, how she must have been embarassed.

In talking with my aunt, Mary Putnam Vandeventer, I found out that my grandfather Putnam had a movie theater in Lueders from the mid 1920s thru the early 1930's. When my aunt was 6 years old in 1929 she saw the first "talking" movie there. The theater was located on the south side of the Hocus Pocus Building. I went down there just now and looked. The foundation is still there directly to the north of the tin building that once was a cotton office and later the domino hall. The theater burned in the early 1930's, the probable cause was the film used at that time. Celluloid used to make film, is highly combustable and the "hang over" heat generated in the film by the movie projectors caused the film to catch fire..after it was stored after the movie was over. Not sure, but that may have been the reason the later Texas Theater caught fire??

Other memories I have of the Texas Theater is that is was stucco on the outside, painted a "pukey" green, and that you entered from the south west corner, thus the aisle that slanted from that corner down to the screen. I remember the theater continued standing after the fire gutted the interior.

NEWS FLASH: The river is on a "rise" today, Friday, August 20. We've been have lots of rain. This is the first true "rise" I've witnessed since I came back in 1997!!!

Thanks Carlene for the picture of the theather in Stamford!!

Stephen Vinson  -  Class of 67


Hi Mrs. Winnie Stapp Barton (1940 graduate),

It's wonderful to see a message from you. It would be good if you would share more of your memories and help us learn more about the olden days. Cheers, Carlene Burkman Black  -  Class of 72


I was trying to determine what happened to the railroad depot that was in Lueders all those years.

B.A. Honey (class of 61) had told me that Willie Parker, who had the feed store in the Hocus Pocus building, bought it when the railroad closed and moved it next to his house and operated his feed store from there.

I talked with Edith Ham and she didn't recall it being there so I called B.A. back and got some more information.

Willie Parker did indeed have it next to his house but not for long. Willie died not too long afterwards and Mrs. Parker sold the depot.

A guy that B.A. knows, Dwaine Hale, who teaches history at Cisco Junior College, bought it from Mrs. Parker for $300 and then paid another $1000 to have it moved to Cisco. It was west of Cisco, about six miles, just off I-20 until about 15 years ago. Miller Beer Company of Abilene paid Dwain $10,000 for the depot and then had it moved to Abilene. It's been restored with a good roof and now sits at Miller Beer, 101 Fulwiler Rd in Abilene, just off Business I-20 West (Business 80 West).

Don Latimer  -  Class of 56


HELLO I AM SURE ENJOYING THIS HISTORY OF LUEDERS ...MY HOME TOWN...BUT HAVE NOT SEEN ANYTHING ABOUT THE NAME ...HOCUS-POCUS BUILDING COME BY ITS NAME ...I REMEMBER THE BRICK BUILDING BUT NEVER NEW WHY IT WAS CALLED THAT ?????THE THEATERS WAS RUN BY A FAMILY NAMED ..NAMES THEY 2 SONS..ONE NAMED JAMES AND THE OTHER NAMED JACK ...JAMES GRADUATED IN 1947 LIKE ME
...DORIS STARKS ELLIOT ...  -  Class of 47
Doris,

Good to hear form you. We need more input from what is now the "older' generaion.It's kind of hard getting used to being the older generalion but we are.

You need to check out the Lueders History that is now posted on the Lueders-Avoca Web site under Lueders History. It mentions both the naming of the Hocus Pocus Building and the Art Names Movie Shows.

Don Latimer  -  Class of 56


I keep seeing a building there in Lueders that everyone keeps calling "The Hocus Pocus Building". Now that I am one of the really old timers, I never heard of a building that was called that. Of course I graduated in 1939 and married in 1940 and left the Lueders area in about 1941. >From the way it has been described I am assuming that it was what was known in my hey day as the Hiram Olsen building, which was then on the west end of the street, just across the road from the Putman Bank. I know it was a 2 story building with apartments and or rooms on the top floor. Also how did it come by that name?
Thanks F. W. BURKMAN  -  Class of 39
Mr. Burkman, I don't recall it being called the Hocus Pocus building either. I graduated in 54. I missed alot of things tho. I do recall most other things talked about. I know the bulding being described but not that name.
Glenn Commons  -  Class of 54
Glen and Mr. Burkman,

I didn't recall it being called that either. A few years ago when I started putting together the Luders History, when I asked about the two storied rock building that stuck out into the street, everyone would say, "Oh, you mean the Hocus Pocus Building.".

Carol Felts mother, Arlene, told me where the name came from.

I've written the following about the building. This is taken from the Lueders-Avoca Web site, which you need to log in to in order to read the history.

Don Latimer  -  Class of 56


Sorry Doris Bird The Names Brothers
Ken Webb  -  Class of 46
I goofed again!!!
Sorry Dorisbirdbut the Names Brothers Were Jean and Jack , Jean was in my Class of 1946. His picture is in the 1946 The Treasure Chest.
Ken Webb  -  Class of 46
I thought some of you might enjoy this old poem. I retyped it so any errors are mine.
Don Latimer  -  Class of 56

OLD FORT PHANTOM HILL ......... By Larry Chittenden

On the breezy Texas border, on the prairie far away,
Where the antelope is grazing and the Spanish ponies play;

Where the tawny cattle wander through the golden incensed hours,
And the sunlight woos a landscape clothed in royal robes of flowers;

Where the Elm and Clear Fork mingle, as they journey to the sea,
And the night-wind sobs sad stories o’er a wild and lonely lea;

Where of old the dusty savage and the shaggy bison trod;
And the reverent plains are sleeping ‘midst drowsy dreams of God;

Where the twilight loves to linger, ever nights sable robes are cast
‘Round grim-ruined, spectral chimneys, telling stories of the past,

There upon an airy mesa, close beside a whispering rill,
There today you’ll find the ruins of the Old Fort Phantom Hill.

Years ago, so runs the legend, ‘bout the year of Fifty-three,
This old fort was first established by the gallant soldier, Lee;

And today the restless spirits of the proud and martial band
Haunt those ghostly, gloomy chimneys in the Texas border land.

There every year at midnight, when the chilling Northers roar;
And the storm-king breathes its thunder from the heights of Labrador,

When the vaulted gloom re-echoes with the owls—“whit-tu-woo!’
And the stealthy cayote answers with his lonely, long “ki-oo!”

The strange phantoms flit in silence through that weeping mesquite vale;
And the reveilles come sounding o’er the old McKenzie Trail,

Then the muffled drums beat muster and the bugles sadly trill,
And the vanished soldiers gather ‘round the heights of Phantom Hill.

Then pale bivouac fires are lighted and those gloomy chimneys glow,
While the grizzled veterans muster from the taps of long ago,

Lee and Johnson and McKenzie, Grant and Jackson, Custer, too,
Gather there in peaceful silence waiting for their last review;

Blue and gray at length united on the high redoubts of fame,
Soldiers all in one grand army, that will answer in God’s name.

Yes, they rest on heights of glory in that fair, celestial world,
“Where the war drum throbs no longer, and the battle-flags are furled.”

And today the birds are singing where was heard the cannons’ roar,
For the gentle doves are nesting ‘midst those ruins of the war.

Yes, the mocking-birds re-echo: “Peace on earth, to men good will,”
And the “swords are turned to ploughshares” in the land of Phantom Hill.


One of the stories I remember my Mother telling me of her earlier days was that during her dating time, most of the guys were gone off to war or away in the military. She was seeing a guy named Lawrence Black for a while and then she and a group of girls went to Abilene to Camp Barkley NCO dance and that's where she was looking across the room and saw my Dad. At the same time he was looking at her and she said there was no force that could have separated them that night. They were married like 3 months later!! LOL After my Dad passed away in 1990, my Mother had often wondered if Lawrence Black was still alive and where he was located. Time flies. I was going to see if I could locate him for her and give her curiosity a rest, but before I knew it she had passed on too. (June 2003) Do any of you folk out there know anything about this gentleman I speak of?

Terry Johnson Blackburn  -  Class of 66 in Abilene
Granddaughter of Mamie Vaughn
Daughter of Odessa Vaughn Johnson


The following Chatter occurred on August 21, 2004

With all due respect, I need to correct something here. I know my grandmother, Eunice Putnam would be admonishing me to correct it right away. The bank in Lueders was never the Putnam bank. As I understand it, it was formed in the early 1900's for the people of Lueders and was first called Lueders State Bank and owned by stockholders including the Henry Lieb, and later, was called Farmer's State Bank. According to Frederick Lieb, my,andfather, Tom Putnam was hired on by the stockholders, Henry Lieb et. al.' around the turn of the century. My grandfather, Tom Putnam, only finished the 6th grade, but later in life had the temerity to go to "business college" I believe in Abilene or Waco, not sure which. So it would figure that he'd make a bank teller to start off with. He stuck with it and later down the road became the bank president. I believe that was in the 1920's ...thru the 40's. Anyway, he had the dubious task of being the president during the depression, but by the skin of the people's teeth at that time.. the bank never closed, as many other banks did. My grandmother, Eunice Putnam, worked as a teller and general clerk at the bank for a number of years and then later worked in an insurance business that she and my grandfather ran. When I was growing up, other kids would ask me if they, my grandmother and grandfather were millionaires. Being the kind of kid who didn't know how to keep his mouth shut...Id ask my grandmother that question...She'd hit the ceiling and tell me in no uncertain terms that they were NOT. She'd continue to tell me how she worked all her life and that I'd do well to keep that in mind when I grew up. So much for that. The bank was never owned by my grandparents. They both worked there is about the size of it.

One interesting side bar: the bank in Lueders made Ripley's Believe it or Not as one of the few banks that did Not fold in the depression.

Re: the Hiram Olson building..(Hocus Pocus Bldg) Hiram Olson had a grocery store there I believe. He and my second cousin, Ivy Smart married and lived in the upstairs "hotel" part of the building in the mid 1920's and early 30's.

Stephen Vinson  -  Class of 67


Now..that many of us seem "primed" and ready to share stories about Lueders... I want to know more about the dam. I have long wanted to write a "little history" about the dam in Lueders..so maybe we can all write it together????

Right now I can hear it "roaring" outside as I sit on my front porch drinking a soda pop. The "rise" has the river up and running over the dam and down those waterfalls. When I was growing up here...my dad would tell me that when he knew the river was up but couldn't hear it "roaring" that meant that it was flowing over the dam at such a high level that it didn't make the sound, and that when it was not as high..yet still running it made that "roaring" sound that we could hear up here. I live in the rock house across from the old I. Z. Brown home. By the way, Dr. Brown's son was killed at the dam in July 1919. As I understand it, the boy of 16 had gone the to observer the construction of the dam and as he was standing on the wagon bridge left in place during most of the construction, a chip of limestone from the blasting flew up and hit him in the head. The wound was so serious that he never recovererd. The boy was brought to the house next door to me where Dr. Brown attempted to revive him.

You can view Dr. Brown's son's tombstone at the Clearfork (Lueder's) Cemetery. On the stone it says: "Killed by accident, July 1919." The dam was finished in 1920 I believe. Arlene Felts told me that Red Felts' father was killed while visiting the site to view the construction. A cable "snapped" and hit him in the head. Arlene told me she remembers that they had a big bargeque to celebrate the completion and people from all Jones County came.

My grandmother told me that while they were building the dam, heavy rains occurred on the watershed of the Clearfork. The floodwaters from these rains almost destroyed the construction and that people from Lueders rushed to the site to help place sandbags in strategic places in an effort to save what had been built.

Eva Mae Wills told me that her parents moved her from Sagerstrom to work on the construction of the dam.

Anyone willing to share other stories about the dam???

Stephen Vinson  -  Class of 67


Please note: in my e-mail about Lueders Dam, I meant to spell the town name Sagerton...not Sagerstrom...(I must have had those "Damned Swedes" in mind that Ernestine was talking about). Also, I would like to nominate Greta (Olson) Corbitt as our official spelling checker, and Edith Ham as our memory checker. Edith's memory is far more reliable than mine!!!
Stephen Vinson  -  Class of 67
Please forgive the strange mistakes in my e-mails, i. e. run on sentences and chopped words and the like. Im writing using AOL and sometimes it seems the "overstrike" feature is on and other times is isn't. When the "overstrike" feature is on it makes in incredibly tedious to correct what one has written, and can cause corrections to fail etc. etc. I hope to find out how to turn off the overstrike feature. Again, appoligies for the mistakes.
Stephen Vinson  -  Class of 67
Stephen, no apology needed on my part, and I'm sure I speak for many others. It's far more important to me to read what you write.....NOT how you spell what you write, ok? Am enjoying every bit of your information. Keep it coming!

Terry Johnson Blackburn  -  Class of 66 in Abilene
Granddaughter of Mamie Vaughn


Stephen Vinson you are completely right!!

I do recall the banks name was the "Lueders State Bank" BUT in the late 20's and early 30s Tom Putman was the top dog there as far as we farmers were concerned because he was the one we always talked to for a lone when we needed one, and I am sure that is why we referred to it at the Putman Building. Thanks for clearing that up for me and all others that did not remember.. Also I appreciate you clearing up, what I referred to as the Hiram Olsen building but I don't recall ever having heard the name Hocus Pocus before, UNLESS it was the chain that operated under. Also we had the Red and White grocery store on the right side of the block looking east and on the left side we had the "Aycock Grocery" which was next to Smokey Fleming Gas Station that was right on the corner. Next to the grocery we had a small Ice House, I believe his name was Nance,then came the Shipp Drug Store, Next to it was a barber shop, then came the Post Office. I remember Hub Brown's Cafe that was next to the Red and White. He made some of the best hamburgers I think I ever ate

Well I have reminisced enough for now. Again Thanks Stephen.

F. W. BURKMAN  -  Class of 39


I think it is amazing the memories that are being exchanged by everyone. As I read each reply another long forgotten memory comes back to life in my mind. If anyone is hesitant to contribute let me share a thought with you from Proverbs and from Spurgeon’s “Morning and Evening”.

Pr 11:25

08/21/AM

"He that watereth shall be watered also himself."
--Proverbs 11:25

We are here taught the great lesson, that to get, we must give; that to accumulate, we must scatter; that to make ourselves happy, we must make others happy; and that in order to become spiritually vigorous, we must seek the spiritual good of others. In watering others, we are ourselves watered. How? Our efforts to be useful, bring out our powers for usefulness. We have latent talents and dormant faculties, which are brought to light by exercise. Our strength for labour is hidden even from ourselves, until we venture forth to fight the Lord's battles, or to climb the mountains of difficulty. We do not know what tender sympathies we possess until we try to dry the widow's tears, and soothe the orphan's grief. We often find in attempting to teach others, that we gain instruction for ourselves. Oh, what gracious lessons some of us have learned at sick beds! We went to teach the Scriptures, we came away blushing that we knew so little of them. In our converse with poor saints, we are taught the way of God more perfectly for ourselves and get a deeper insight into divine truth. So that watering others makes us humble. We discover how much grace there is where we had not looked for it; and how much the poor saint may outstrip us in knowledge. Our own comfort is also increased by our working for others. We endeavour to cheer them, and the consolation gladdens our own heart. Like the two men in the snow; one chafed the other's limbs to keep him from dying, and in so doing kept his own blood in circulation, and saved his own life. The poor widow of Sarepta gave from her scanty store a supply for the prophet's wants, and from that day she never again knew what want was. Give then, and it shall be given unto you, good measure, pressed down, and running over.

The memories you are sharing with one another here are bringing joy to some setting on the sidelines and as a whole we may never know the joy that is being spread. I have copied some of the thoughts and sent to my children to preserve for my grandchildren. So keep the thoughts coming --- you are spreading joy --- even to yourself!!

Chuck Thomas  -  Class of 60


Stephen, You are right about "Mr. Put", as he was called when I was growing up in Lueders in the 1940s. I remember when my uncle Carl Tonroy and aunt Jessie Lee Curry got married. If I remember right she worked at the bank and he might have. at any rate your Grandmother gave them a reception at their house. I just barely remember the event and what I remember most were the "long" dresses they all wore. I also remember when Mr.&MRS Put built their house. WE (all of Lueders) thought it was a mansion because it cost 10,000 dollars. My uncle Les Tonroy did all the finish work on the inside painting papering etc. Your mom can probably give you more info about this because if I remember right she went to school with Luckie Tonroy '49. Also ask your mom for more detail but I think maybe Mr Put and Sam Rayborn were friends. Some where in the back of my mind I remember hearing this. Anyway were you aware that the Sam Rayborn Library in Bonham Texas is built out of Lueders stone? When they set the corner stone they transposed the e and u and spelled it Leuders. In reference to the Hocus Pocus building I have never heard it referred to by any other name. As I said before that was what it was called in 1935 when my parents live "over"it. Mr Burkman is right about Ayecock grocery but Mr. Parker owned it before Ayecock. but there were several businesses between Ayecocks and Smokey's. The drygood storethe drug store. Ergle Whites auto store ,Mr Diggs barbershop. The Red& White grocery was owned by Mr Odell whose two daughters Donnie and Mary Lou both graduated from Lueders. I don't know when. Donnie was later severely injured in a car wreck. I remember the old telephone party lines we had and so as to not disturb the Odells all the time , when we would hear their ring most everyone on that line would listen in to hear how Donnie was that day. The man who owned the Ice House was Ruben Nance. They lived at the end of the road that went to the football field. You keep going straight instead of turning right. We lived on the corner where you turned. My dad Fred Hines worked for the refinery and at the start of football season he would always oil the road to keep down the dust and needless to say all the pep squad would be mad because they had to walk through fresh oil to get to the football field. Also the bank was the Farmers State Bank. It may have been Lueders State Bank at a later date but as far back as 1945 and as late as 1966 it was still Farmers State Bank because I have some cancelled checks where my grandmother Tonroy paid her taxes. It is so neat to hear all the things everyone remembers about Lueders and then brings to mind some long lost memory. Please keep it all coming
Sharon Rose "Hines" Hudson  -  Class of 57
Don, you probably have it in your history but for everyone else, the Texas Theater was owned and operated by Horis Davis' family. Horis and my sister Ollie graduated in the same class and then married and moved to and still live in Abilene.
Aaron Petty  -  Class of 54
Aaron,

Is there a problem I don't know about in people accessing the Lueders-Avoca web site and then signing in and clicking on Lueders History. I thought everyone on this mailing list was eligible to do that.

http://www.luedersavoca.com/

Here's what I said about the Texas Theater.

A new movie house was built about 1947. The name of the new business was the Texas Theater. The Texas Theatre was operated by the V. E. Davis family. It was a family operation; his son, Horis, would run the projector. They had speakers mounted on a car roof and would drive down the street playing music and announcing what movies were playing. The Texas Theater featured cash "Hot Seat" drawings on weekends. About 1949, the Davis family sold out to a Mr. Blaylock and moved to Moran to reopen a theatre there. The Texas Theater burned down in 1950. After the theater burned, the closest movies were in Stamford where you had your choice of the Grand Theater, Palace Theatre (a few doors west of the Grand), State Theater, or the H and H Drive In.

Don Latimer  -  Class of 56


Stephen--my husband always says that once a teacher, always a teacher. Guess he's right!
Greta "Olson"  -  Class of 52
Hi Former Students and Friends,

To go directly to Don's "A Little History of Lueders, Texas", you can click on the link below.

http://www.luedersavoca.com/luavla/lhs/1-holt/1-holt.html ; sign-in with your account username and password.

If you can't click to go there, then copy the web link above and paste it in your web browser address bar or go to the Lueders Avoca On-Line web site; http://www.luedersavoca.com and click on Sign In, then click on Lueders History Link.

If you have problems and need help, you can personally e-mail me at support@luedersavoca.com or webmaster@luedersavoca.com Please do not reply to this message if you need help at the web site, send a new message to my email address.

Regards,

Carlene  -  Class of 72 and LAO Admin


The following Chatter occurred on August 22, 2004

I've been discussing with my aunt Maxine Vaughn Payne some of the topics that have been discussed in the forums. Some of the things she wrote about have already been solved, but she wrote me what she knew of during her days. I asked her about the tin building at the end of town and she also solved that portion of discussion for me. She had told me if it's the same building she's thinking about, that my Grandfather did indeed have his shoe shop in it at one time, as did she a beauty shop. Said she'd have to see it to be sure which one is being talked about. The following is what she wrote:

The Hokus Pokus Bldg. burned down while J.C. Register owned it. The Lueders Bank was called "Farmers's State Bank" while Corinne Vaughn Cox worked there, I have never heard it called the Putnam Bldg, but I left there in 1947. Yes Mr. Mitchell had a plumbing business in Hokus Pokus Bldg. He did the plumbing in the little beauty shop I put in in Mr. Fox's metal bldg. He had two daughters, Dorthy Dell and Lela Mae who with her husband Elvie Smith put in a variety store in what was the old Red and White grocery store. At he time I had the little beauty shop, Hub Brown had a cafe in what I believe use to be Earnest Smart's cafe. I worked there as a waitress for Earnest Smart a short time before going to Beauty School.

**(see note at bottom from Terry)** Doctor Baily was a very young doctor when he had his office in back of Shipps Drug Store. I remember mother was afraid he didn't know enough, but in later years when he moved to Abilene, she went to him. He was my doctor while I was pregnant with my second son. I remember Dr. Brown, and Doctor Williams. Do you remember Dr. Mc Donald? They had three children, N.F., D.N. and Barbara. When they lived in Stamford, D.N. died of a heat stroke from Playing baseball in the heat. Earlier years there was Dr. Louder who delivered Mamie Vaughn's twins, Corinne and Maxine Vaughn. There was a Dr. Dunlap.

Yes, there was an ice house owned by Rubin Nance. Daddy (George Vaughn the shoe shop owner) used to carry a block of ice home every day. He held it by the narrow ropelike twine and it melted some before he got home. We had to HURRY when we opened the ice box and not let the cold air out!

Remember, we even had a little movie theater a while. It was south of the Hokus Pokus Bldg. For ten cents we could see Shirley Temple, Jane Withers, Spanky, Mickey Rooney, etc. We didn't get to go much. We didn't have the money to BLOW! Maxine Vaughn Payne '42

**When I was reading the discussions about the Doctors and saw Dr. Bailey mentioned, it confused me because I thought Dr. Bailey was the Dr. who delivered me in Abilene. We were living in Albany and Daddy had to drive Mother to Abilene to have me.I had no idea Dr. Bailey started out in Lueders before moving to Abilene.....**

Terry Johnson Blackburn  -  Class of 66 in Abilene
Maxine's niece


HEY DON.....WHO IS THIS OLDER GENERATION ???? HOW DO I GET TO THIS SIGHT YOU ARE TALKING ABOUT ????WOULD LOVE TO READ IT
THANKS, DORIS STARKS ELLIOT  -  Class of 47
You know I keep seeing some of you young whippersnappers referring to yourselves as the older generation. I guess those of the 20's, 30's and 40's are going to have to start referring to ourselves as the Super Senior's, or maybe just Senior's at least. It is just a thought I had.
F. W. BURKMAN  -  Class of 39
Hello Alumni, teachers and friends,

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a.Quote original messages to maintain continuity for the other readers. Please do not erase the previous replies in the message you are replying to except the mailing list footer signature note/message explained in the paragraph (c.) below. If your mail program doesn't automatically include the original message you are replying to, please set your mail program options to include the message in reply.

b. Please sign your messages and provide your class graduating year even if at a different school. People have no way of knowing who you are if you don't type your name at the bottom of your post. This is especially important if your email address is something like dpswtc40 @something.com.

c. ** Trim the ends of messages off. Most all mailing lists append every message with a special signature note/message. This may be a couple, to several lines of text. If you ever catch yourself responding to a message and leaving that footer in, before you hit send, ask yourself why. If it conveys no additional information, as your answer will have it appended as well, why include it? It is useless and should be trimmed; remove/delete it when replying (remember, your reply will carry a copy of the footer too, so if it's useful once, it's useless when displayed two or more times).

3. Important: Subject Lines and Replying :

a. If you stray from the original subject of a original message, stop and think to start a new message instead of confusing people with the old subject. Please create a new mail message and address it to pirates@luedersavoca.org. Remember to add a subject in the subject line of your message.

4. ** A Short List Of Don'ts:

a. Send no messages with "Attachments", "Forwarded Messages", "CC:" (Carbon Copy) and "BCC:" (Blind Carbon Copy).
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Thank you and enjoy the mailing list!

Cheers,
Carlene
Pirates Mailing List Admin.
Lueders Avoca On-Line
http://www.luedersavoca.com


The "tin" building that I believe is being referred to here was owned by one of the Fox brothers. He built a house directly north of the building, across from City Hall.

It stood there for as long as I can remember. Recently, Russell Mullins purchased it and moved it to his home (The Guy Price house).

This building was well built it seems, even though it was made from tin.

I was told it was originally built as an office for the stone mills? and later served as the shoe shop, and beauty shop that Mrs. Vaughn refers to.

Stephen Vinson  -  Class of 67


Are you guys talking about the tin bldg. south of the Hocus Pocus? Where the men played dominoes in the '60's, '70's, etc.? At one time that housed a newspaper, 'during my day', and the people l remember that had it were named Huto.
Reba G "Meil" Davis  -  Class of 49
I WOULD LIKE TO KNOW HOW I CAN TAKE MY EMAIL ADDRESS OFF THE LUEDERS PIRATES LIST.? THANK YOU VERY MUCH
BILL WILLINGHAM  -  Class of 38
Reba, the building I've been talking about was the last building on the left of the downtown buildings that stood out by itself on the way towards Albany. I'm not a good one for directions as "south", etc.

Terry Johnson Blackburn  -  Class of 66 in Abilene
Niece of Maxine Vaughn Payne


Ok, we're not in the same part of town.
Reba G "Meil" Davis  -  Class of 49
Has Terry and Reba seen the pictures that are linked on the bottom of Don Latimer's "A Little History of Lueders, Texas" which is on the Lueders Web Site and on the menu as Lueders History --- The Tin Building which Terry mentiond in her previous message is shown in the pictures I took in October of 2003 while home for homecoming.
One of Frank's Young Whipper Snappers -- E. Ray Smyth  -  Class of 53
Yes, that is the building I believe each is talking about. You are correct later in the 60-70's they played dominos. Several of the men paid the electric bill for he privelege of playing there. It was a great social for the eldery and young.
Glenn Commons  -  Class of 54
Yes, E. Ray.....that is what brought my question up in the 1st place to my aunt. I was thinking that building was the one my grandpa had his shoe shop in, so now I'm totally confused as to what my aunt is telling me....maybe best I stay out of "this" conversation. LOL
Terry Johnson Blackburn  -  Class of 66 in Abilene
Granddaughter of Mamie Vaughn
The following Chatter occurred on August 23, 2004

I am interested in any information folks have about the Lueders Dam. Any kind of information would be great such as personal memories especially!!
Stephen Vinson  -  Class of 67
I really don't have any information about the Lueders Dam. But I do have pictures of the Lueders Dam with seveal of us teen agers there. This was when the dam was real low and we could walk nearly across it. I also remember the floods and all the trees and different things that were coming down the river. I did notice one guy writiing in about when the dam was built and some people gettting killed. My pictures were in the late 40"s. Glad to get off the tin building and the Hocus Pocus building. I agree with you I would like to hear more about the dam.

Rena "McAlister" Potter  -  Class of 50


OK! You have been wanting some of those 'Lueders Dam' stories. First of all I will have to tell that we lived in the 'Tonroy House' on the highway which really wasn't that far from the dam. Wanda Shott, one of my best friends lived close by and I can't remember whose place they were on but do know that house has been moved to Lueders. We spent a lot of our summers of 1958-59 swimming at the dam. She had a cousin from Abilene and I had a friend also from Abilene that would come visit in the summer. We spent many a summer afternoon walking from our house to the dam. When the water was slowly running over the dam, we would slide down it to the bottom. You can imagine what it did to the seats of our swimsuits. There was a lot of rough places and it is a miracle that we did not get cut or really hurt doing that. I used to wear a gold chain with a cross on it. That cross is still somewhere at the dam or down the river. I have lots of pleasant memories of those summers.

Another one would be a dumb stunt I did at the tall pump house at the dam or I guess that is what is was. Remember when we took test at school and you would have time in between test. Once several of us, can't remember who all but do know it was me, Wanda Shott, Lyndia Wills and others in our class walked from Lyndia's (Linda) house through the pasture and across the railroad bridge to the dam. We all explored the area. We decided to see if we could climb from inside the 'tower' building, pump house or what ever it was and see how high we could go. I ended up in one of the window opening's at the top. To this day I can not tell you how I got there. Down below was water running to I don't know where. I do know if I had fallen it would have been very difficult to get me even if I could have lived through it. I have always had vertigo and guess I was going to out do it. I don't know but it was a dumb kid thing to do. We did all get back to school in time for the next test. You know that old railroad bridge was were all the guys went for what I would call their 'suicide dives'. I believe at that time Gary Berryhill held the record.

When you talked about other parks; I know there was one about the east end (if I have my directions right) of the dam. We used to have one of our family reunions there in the mid 60's after I moved away from there. It was small but plenty of room for us. The grass was really mowed and kept nice. Mother said that Mr. Davis was the one that let us in or was the caretaker of it. She believes it was Squeaky Davis dad. At that time we could still go to the dam and swim. So even then we had lots of fun at the dam.

Patsy (Pat) "Culpepper" Roberts  -  Class of 61


Sorry! That's Patsy (Pat) Culpepper Roberts  -  Class of 61
Dear Fellow Pirates,

As most of you know Carlene "Burkman" Black allows me the privilege to be the Web Master of the Pirate portion of the Lueders-Avoca Web Site which means I do that portions of the site from the time of Lueders creation until consolidation after the 1967 school year ended.

I was some what amazed by the immediate response to the announcement of August 12th when via the Pirate Mailing List, I informed everyone that Don Latimer's "A Little History of Lueders, Texas" had been posted on the Internet.

I have a difficult time calling it "The Pirate Mailing List" and prefer the name "Pirate Chat Line" because it is a lot like having a party line back in our times of the Lambert Telephone Company because we have about 60 Pirates tied into the same line for chatting back and forth.

AND you have really been providing a lot of "chatter" lately. For the 11 day period since the announcement on the 12th until August 22 you have sent out 175 messages telling wonderful stories about Lueders. (An average of 16 messages each day)

While admittedly some of the messages only amounted to a grunt or an UGH!, for the most part they have been like a walk down memory lane and a very nostalgic walk I might add.

I have heard things like, "Keep writing" - "I'm printing this out for my kids" - "I can't wait to open my e-mail each day" and ON and ON.

As your web master, I could not let those stories end up in the Recycle Bin or the Trash Can. I wanted to see your memories preserved for all that follow us..

I therefore expend some time and have thus far made Web Pages out of the first four days of messages which is August 12th through August 16th or what amounts to the first 97 messages. I personally had 3 duplicate messages because folks sent the same message twice.

At this time I made no effort to edit anything and did strictly a COPY and PASTE to put the messages into the Web Page.

The ONLY Liberty I took was to add the persons name and Class year at the bottom when that was not provided.

Perhaps at some later date there could be some editing done and some messages even deleted when they don't add much to the subject at hand. However, for now I have just took the messages in order as I received them via the Pirate e-mail and posted just the top portion which means I did not include any Forwarding info or attachments like stuff.

NOW LISTEN UP -- The ONLY place these messages are posted or will be posted is in the PRIVATE part of the Lueders-Avoca Web Site under the Lueders History section.

ONLY, Registered Users of the Web Site will have access to the page I have now titled "Memories of Lueders, Texas"

With that said, Anybody who objects in anyway of having their stories or messages posted and after seeing the way they have been done still want their messages removed then all you need do is ask and I will immediately remove your messages .

If the general consensus is that you don't like what has been done then I will, with some regret, remove all the messages and eliminate the Memories Section.

If the general consensus agrees and approves of what has been done then I am willing to continue to compile those message which pertain to the Historical Memories of Lueders, Texas for so long as they continue to come in and with the expectation there will be a dropping off at some point and then stop completely.

To review the "Memories of Lueders, Texas" go to the Pirate Section of the Lueders-Avoca Web Site at:.. http://www.luedersavoca.com .....and click on the "Lueders History" link on the menu. The First or Next History Page will provide another menu that has a link to the "Memories of Lueders, Texas."

NUFF SAID and time to vote ........... Please take a look at "Memories of Lueders, Texas" let us know via the Pirate Chat Line what your feelings are......... To continue or not to continue.

THANKS, E. Ray Smyth  -  Class of 53 and your Pirate Web Master


Hey! I like it. Looks good to me.
Patsy (Pat) "Culpepper" Roberts  -  Class of 61
E. Ray – you and Carlene and everyone else who are contributing to the site are doing a good job and a great thing. Do not stop. Our children and grandchildren will someday, if not today want to read about us and it will be here for them.

Thanks, Chuck Thomas  -  Class of 60


The following Chatter occurred on August 24, 2004

I hope it continues. I would like to hear Commons comment on when he was burned so badly and missed a great deal of school. Our class went to visit him in the hospital but I can't remember if it was first or second grade.
Carol Felts  -  Class of 53
Ray I just had a perusal of the web site and as I scanned it, I found it to be very entertaining and refreshing. Some of the things you posted I had forgot about, and were very good reminders. I am one that is glad that this did occur.
F. W. BURKMAN  -  Class of 39
Please Everett Ray, Don't stop now Sharon "Hines" Hudson  -  Class of 57
Carol it was first grade and I was in the hospital for 55 days. Dr. Bunckley was a wonderful Dr. he saved my left arm. I have 3 or 4 skin graphs, they took the skin off my legs around the thigh area. I am very thankful to the good lord above for giving Dr. Bunckley the knowledge that saved my arm.

I had to stay in the first grade another year since I had missed so much. I still didn't learn a lot. ha god bless

Glenn Commons  -  Class of 54


As you can see below, the web site is almost out of money. After the web hosting monthly fee is paid for September, the balance will be $ .51. I know each of you appreciate the time and money that Carlene expends to furnish this wonderful tool of communication.

If you can spare $25 or more, please make a contribution. Carlene has much time and money invested in the site, and she needs our support. There are several ways to make a donation: credit card, check, money order, or PayPal. Please help her so that we may continue to keep in touch and in the know on the happenings of each of the groups.

06.01.04 Web Hosting Monthly Fee -25.00 +75.51
07.01.04 Web Hosting Monthly Fee -25.00 +50.51
08.01.04 Web Hosting Monthly Fee -25.00 +25.51

Sandra Reves  -  Class of 65 in Avoca


Where do we send the donations?

Terry Johnson Blackburn  -  Class of 66 in Abilene
Granddaughter of Mamie Vaughn


I've been trying to list all the doctors that were in Lueders and I don't have much information on Doctor Bailey. Terry Johnson Blackburn came up with his initals from her birth certificate. It was signed S. W. Bailey. By 1947, when Terry was born, Dr. Bailey was practicing medicine in Abilene.

Terry also came up with a Name, Stanfill William Bailey (1906-1950), who was a Texas doctor. The only thing, Terry believes that her mother was still seeing Dr. Bailey around 1953 or '54.

Dr. Bailey had an office in the back of Shipps' Drug Store when he was in Lueders.

Does anyone have anything to add to Dr. Bailey of Lueders? Was his name Stanfill William Bailey? When did he die? Did he have a son that was a doctor also?

Don Latimer  -  Class of 56


Dr. Bailey was supposed to deliver my cousin in 1950.....he was born in Jan 1950, but my aunt said Dr. Bailey was out of town and another Abilene doctor delivered him. Now I'm wondering if maybe he had passed away or something. If only we could find out the month Dr. Bailey died....... The Lueders newspaper that I found dated 1941 listed Dr. Bailey and a Dr. Estes having offices in Abilene then, with an address, so we know Dr. Bailey wasn't in Lueders in 1941. Terry Johnson Blackburn  -  Class of 66 in Abilene
Granddaughter of Mamie Vaughn

Personallly, I do not remember a Doctor in Lueders in the early 50's. Most used the doctors in Stamford or Anson.
Glenn Commons  -  Class of 54
Glen,

You're correct. I was speaking of the 40's or before. What I've written so far is:

Among the early-day doctors were G. C. Dial (1832-1917), I. Z. Brown (1865-1930), E. Lee Loudder (1874-1931), Newton F. McDonald (1875-1944). Robert Dunlap (1880-1932), C. W. Williams, and S. W. Bailey, They weren’t all there at the same time. Dr. Bailey had an office in Shipp’s Drug Store, but by 1947, he was practicing medicine in Abilene. Dr. McDonald went to Stamford. Dr. Williams was practicing medicine in Lueders in 1944. He lived right across from Rockwell Bros. Lumber Company and had an office in Williams Drug Store..

Don Latimer  -  Class of 56


My aunt Maxine Vaughn Payne told me today that Dr. Brown had an office in a little white building behind Shirley's Cafe. Red Felts later had a service station there.....
Terry Johnson Blackburn  -  Class of 66 in Abilene
Niece of Maxine Vaughn Payne

I have been wondering if the Lueders Dam would be mentioned. Most of you probably do not know me. I went to Lueders School through 6th grade before we moved to Anson. Part of the time we lived on an oil lease near Nugent and rode the bus to Lueders for 2 or 3 years before moving to Anson. My sister Kay also went to Lueders School. I made many new friends in Anson but have always thought of Lueders as home. I still have fond memories of Dad taking me fishing below the dam when water was going over the spillway. One time what I thought was a fish kept coming by and my dad told me to try to catch the thing. I did by its bill and it felt like a bunch of pins. Yep, it was a gar.

I do not think Lueders had a doctor  when I was born. Dr. Metz in Stamford delivered me. Mr. Shipp was the next thing to my doctor on many occasions. Seems like he had an office or back room we would go to stick things down my throat and maybe even a shot now and then. Mr. Shipp was a real asset to Lueders in those times.

Anyone remember the barbers in late 30’s early 40”s. I recall Mr. Scott and his hand clippers. I do not remember him having any electric clippers. His clippers seemed to pull about as much hair out as was snipped off.

My Dad, Thomas Murray- many referred to him as “Tommy”, was born in 1914 and graduated from LHS in the early 30’s. He married my Mother, Nealy Gentry Murray from Stamford and I came along in 1938. Unfortunately, Dad died at age 50 in 1965 and we never got to talk much about family history, etc. Some may remember hearing about the CCC camps. Out of High School things were tough and he along with many others from all over the country worked in a CCC camp in New Mexico to send money home. He ran a cafĂ© for about a year by Fred’s Garage when I was in about the first grade. He also worked at the Refinery, the Rock Quarry and later in the oilfield. Mom, at age 86, still lives in Anson. I have printed E. Rays summary so she can read of those days.

Dad’ parents, Lilly and Tom Murray, sold their farm to kind of South of Lueders to a Mr. Hester and moved into town in the late 30’s or early 40’s. I doubt I know its exact location but it would be interesting to know who presently owns the farm and the house in Lueders. It is a Rock house that has burned. Anyhow, they lived on the street, I believe East of E.Ray Smyth. I believe Marie Watkins lived a few houses North of my Grandmother. Dad had two sisters, Effie and Rosa, and a brother Dick who died at about age 21. Effie married Alva Dillard and their son Max graduated with E. Ray. While attending HSU, my dad and I worked for Bob Counts at Debco Refinery where a lot of men from Lueders were also employed.

OK, this got longer than I intended so I better end it here.

John T. Murray  -  Class of 57 in Anson


In a message dated 8/24/2004 7:54:19 PM Central Daylight Time, tblack@web-access.net writes:

My aunt Maxine Vaughn Payne told me today that Dr. Brown had an office in a little white building behind Shirley's Cafe. Red Felts later had a service station there.....

Terry Johnson Blackburn '66 Abilene High
Niece of Maxine Vaughn Pain

The red brick building that Dr. Brown had his office in, is still where at least the "shell" is. The fieldstone building where Jack Felts had his service station was once owned by my Aunt Mary (Seth) Smart. She ran a gas station there! I believe Erna (Baselined) Smart also did bookkeeping there at one time. This was way before I was born.

Stephen Venison  -  Class of 67 .. wish ya'll would send some more "Dam" stories!!


If you will click on the link below, it will take you to the web site page that has donation information and procedures on it. Thank you for asking--others may want to contribute and do not know how or where.

http://www.luedersavoca.com/pub/support/pusupport.html

Sandra Reves  -  Class of 65 in Avoca


You're right Stephen.....my mistake. Went back and looked at notes I took when Aunt was talking to me on phone and it was a red brick building....not little white building. oops! Thanks for correcting this.

Terry Johnson Blackburn  -  Class of 66 in Abilene
Daughter of Odessa Vaughn Johnson


Does anyone know the whereabouts of Cheryl and Bob McCorkle? They lived in Nugent but went to school in Lueders, until moving to Abilene in 1964 or '65. Rusty McCorkle, their brother was killed in Viet Nam in '64 or '65 and when the Viet Nam War Memorial was here in Brownwood, his name was on it.

Also, enclosed is a link to a picture I need help with identities. The little girl on the left is my Mother Odessa Vaughn Johnson. My aunt Maxine Vaughn Payne said that my grandmother was good friends with Mrs. Fickel and that the other two children could possibly be the Fickel children. Can anyone help me out here?

http://luedersavoca.org/imagememories/terry_mother.jpg

Terry Johnson Blackburn  -  Class of 66 in Abilene
Daughter of Odessa Vaughn Johnson


To continue reading with the Chatter which occurred on August 25, 2004 Click:...   HERE

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